Grants Will Fund Recovery Efforts in Education, Health Care, and Combatting Human Trafficking

Nepal_ Bolgaon_destruction_copyrightWashington, DC – The Center for Disaster Philanthropy has awarded four grants totaling more than $600,000 from its CDP Nepal Earthquake Recovery Fund for recovery efforts after the 7.8 and 7.3 magnitude earthquakes that struck Nepal this spring. This portfolio of grants focuses on the unique needs of child protection following disaster in a country where children were already extremely vulnerable.

The four grantees are:

All Hands Volunteers will receive $100,000 to help rebuild earthquake-devastated schools with a total enrollment of 1,667 students in Nepal’s Nuwakot District, where nearly 90 percent of the schools were destroyed. All Hands Volunteers mission is “to address the immediate and long-term needs of communities impacted by natural disasters by engaging and leveraging volunteers, partner organizations, and communities.

Plan International USA will receive $219,690 to fund its Fighting Against Child Trafficking in Emergencies (FACTE) Project in Nepal. FACTE “aims to empower communities to protect children’s rights and to prevent the trafficking and exploitation of children in the aftermath of the disaster.”

Project HOPE will receive $219,956 to strengthen the maternal newborn and child health service delivery system and improve hygiene behavior in the Makawanpur District of Nepal. Project HOPE “delivers essential medicines and supplies, health expertise, and medical training to respond to disaster, prevent disease, promote wellness, and save lives around the globe.”

Shakti Samuha will receive $61,264 to reduce vulnerability to human trafficking and other kinds of violence by providing income generation skills and education support for women and children in the districts of Sindupalchowk, Ramechhap, and Sindhuli. Shakti Samuha’s mission is “to involve affected women and children and those at high risk of human trafficking in anti human trafficking campaign to ensure & protect the rights of survivor through awareness, organizing, and empowering themselves.”

“Too often after a disaster like the Nepal earthquake, there is a flood of support in the immediate aftermath and very little funding available for for mid- and long-term recovery,” said Bob Ottenhoff, President and CEO of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy. “We created the CDP Nepal Earthquake Recovery Fund to help donors collaborate in identifying and funding efforts that will help Nepal fully rebuild from this disaster. And we wanted to support initiatives to address needs that are often overlooked in disaster recovery. We believe that these grantees and their work will have a tremendous impact on the lives of the Nepalese and the recovery of their nation.”

For more information on the CDP Nepal Earthquake Recovery Fund, visit the Center for Disaster Philanthropy website at http://disasterphilanthropy.org/.

CDP’s mission is to transform disaster giving by providing timely and thoughtful strategies to increase donors’ impact during domestic and international disasters. With an emphasis on recovery and disaster risk reduction, CDP aims to:

  • Increase the effectiveness of contributions given to disasters;
  • Bring greater attention to the life cycle of disasters, from preparedness and planning, to relief, to rebuilding and recovery efforts;
  • Provide timely and relevant advice from experts with deep knowledge of disaster philanthropy;
  • Conduct due diligence so donors can give with confidence; and,
  • Create plans for informed giving for individuals, corporations and foundations.