Nepal_Earthquake_2015_01_int
Photo: Krish Dulal used under a Creative Commons License.

The earthquake that hit Nepal on Saturday, April 25, 2015, with a magnitude of 7.8 is the worst in more than 80 years. Officials estimate that thousands of people have been killed or injured.

The focus of the world will rightly be on helping survivors with immediate response and relief. Assistance is pouring in from relief organizations across the globe as people are rescued and emergency housing and food are provided and families hoping to find loved ones. Meanwhile we wait to learn more about the full extent of the destruction.

While the world focuses on Nepal’s immediate needs, it’s also not too early to begin planning for longer-term recovery, which is the purpose of our fund. We know from past disasters, such as Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina, the Typhoon Haiyan , and the South Asian Tsunami, that the time needed to fully recover takes months and years. That is why the Center for Disaster Philanthropy (CDP) uniquely focuses on highlighting the long view of disaster recovery. In response to the needs that will arise from this devastating earthquake, the CDP Nepal Earthquake Recovery Fund will focus on medium- and long-term rebuilding and recovery. Earthquakes can be more devastating than other natural disasters because they usually occur without warning. They can also be more difficult to respond to because the ability of relief organizations to access and maneuver within the affected region is hampered by damage to airports, roads blocked by debris, and buildings unsafe to enter.

We expect that this disaster will leave hundreds of thousands of people without permanent shelter, access to clean water, and appropriate medical care. Livelihoods such as small businesses will need to be rebuilt. The CDP Nepal Earthquake Recovery Fund is here to help with these long-term needs.

The CDP Nepal Earthquake Recovery Fund allows donors to focus on long-term recovery. Through CDP’s unparalleled expertise in disaster management and grantmaking, we will invest in projects and initiatives that:

  • support vulnerable populations whose lives and livelihoods have been devastated;
  • emphasize funding that is medium- and long-term in nature and based upon the 
prevailing needs that emerge in the weeks and months to come;
  • fill in gaps where public resources are unavailable or scarce; and
  • foster collaborative relationships among donors—including the sharing of information 
with funders and nonprofit organizations.

The programmatic expertise of CDP’s board, staff, and advisory council—paired with an extensive network of disaster management actors and academics—guides the organization’s grantmaking strategy. Emphasis is placed on investing well rather than investing quickly, addressing the greatest needs and gaps in funding that may be yet to emerge. CDP will provide due diligence so donors can give to the fund with confidence and ensured accountability. We have been in touch with NGOs and partner organizations to understand immediate needs on the ground. We will continue close coordination over the coming weeks and months.

For questions about the fund, please contact:

Regine A. Webster
Vice President
(206) 972-0187
regine.webster@disasterphilanthropy.org

Robert G. Ottenhoff
President & CEO
(202) 595-1026
bob.ottennhoff@disasterphilanthropy.org

Photo: Krish Dulal used under a Creative Commons License.